Tag Archives: 上海千花mm自荐

Wolfowitz negotiating resignation

first_imgIt was not clear whether the bank’s 24-member board would accept Wolfowitz’s terms. It is up to the board to decide what action should be taken in the matter. Pressure on Wolfowitz to resign has grown since the bank panel report, released Monday, regarding his handling of the 2005 pay package of bank employee Shaha Riza. Wolfowitz has maintained that he acted in good faith. WASHINGTON – Embattled World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz is negotiating an agreement to resign, according to an official familiar with the talks. His departure would include an acknowledgment from the bank that he doesn’t bear sole responsibility for the controversy surrounding a generous pay package for his girlfriend, the official said. The negotiations took place as the bank’s board deliberated Wolfowitz’s fate Wednesday afternoon. The official said Wolfowitz wanted the bank to accept some responsibility for conflicts of interest cited against him by a special bank panel. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because of the delicate state of negotiations at the bank, which uses loans and grants to fight poverty around the world. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Prince Rupert Port to Welcome More Cruise Ships in 2017

first_imgzoom British Columbia’s Port of Prince Rupert expects more than a 100% increase in the number of ships and passengers visiting the coastal community this summer, according to its 2017 cruise schedule.A total of 25 vessels carrying around 17,000 passengers will dock at Prince Rupert’s Northland Cruise Terminal in 2017, representing the city’s biggest cruise season since 2011. The coming season also marks the second consecutive year that the number of cruise ship passengers visiting Prince Rupert has doubled, up from 7,264 in 2016 and 3,626 in 2015.“In addition to the increased number of vessels and guests Prince Rupert will see this year, we’re also excited that 20 of those vessels are participating in our shore excursion program and are taking full advantage of the unique tours and activities of our destination,” Don Krusel, President and CEO of the Prince Rupert Port Authority, said.“It’s great to see cruise lines including Prince Rupert on their Alaskan itineraries for the first time, and the return of lines that we’ve had the pleasure of hosting in the past,” Krusel added.Seabourn Cruise Line is returning to Alaska for the first time in 15 years, and will include Prince Rupert on six voyages of the 450-passenger Seabourn Sojourn beginning on June 23. Crystal Cruises will return to Prince Rupert for three calls in 2017, after the inaugural visit of its Crystal Serenity ship in 2016 on the heels of its sailing of the Northwest Passage.Norwegian Cruise Line is coming back to Prince Rupert for the first time since 2011, with the two largest vessels of the 2017 season. The Oceania Regatta will also return for seven calls this season, bringing the largest share of Prince Rupert passenger traffic with capacity for 4,788 guests. Regent Seven Seas Cruises will sail the Seven Seas Mariner into the Prince Rupert’s harbour for two calls, and Ponant’s 264-passenger Le Boreal will make one of the last calls of the season in September.last_img read more

Two American Women arrested for Drug Possession on Cruise Ship

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#magneticmedianews #americanwomenarrestedfordrugs Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, June 7, 2017 – Nassau – American women arrested for drug possession on a cruise ship.Police Tourism Unit officers yesterday took two American women into custody after they found a quantity of dangerous drugs in their possession.The pair was visiting The Bahamas via cruise when found with illicit drugs.Reports are that shortly before 8:00am on June 6, officers assigned to the Police Tourism Unit, acting on information went onboard a cruise ship the at Prince George Dock, where they arrested the two women after they found a quantity of marijuana in their possession.#magneticmedianews#americanwomenarrestedfordrugslast_img read more

City of Imperial beach proposing to add public bathrooms

first_imgCity of Imperial beach proposing to add public bathrooms KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO ( KUSI) – The City of Imperial Beach is proposing to add public bathrooms at the corner of Beach Avenue and Sea Coast Drive.The Port of San Diego and the City of Imperial Beach held a public meeting where the potential bathrooms would be placed.Residents were invited to voice their opinions on the proposed plan. June 25, 2019 Posted: June 25, 2019 Categories: California News, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

At CES 2019 LG on juggling AI smarts and protecting our personal

first_img Share your voice 3:01 Smart Home Security Preview • Mycroft wants to be your smart-home’s brain Now playing: Watch this: All the cool new gadgets at CES 2019 CES 2019 Mycroft Smart Home AI Platform What the heck is LG’s ThinQ AI? LG executive David Vanderwaal shows off a homebrew machine and talks AI. Angela Lang/CNET For the past two years, LG has talked up the prospects of artificial intelligence. At CES 2019, the company pushed its ThinQ AI platform forward by allowing it to give you personalized recommendations based on your usage pattern. But that means collecting your data at a time when consumers are waking up to the fact that tech companies have been exploiting our personal information — sometimes with disastrous results. David Vanderwaal, senior vice president of marketing for LG Electronics’ US arm, as well as the main presenter at today’s CES 2019 press conference, helped break down how the company’s AI platform works, the issue of data privacy and why consumers should care. The following is an edited transcript of our interview. Tags 0 Q: What the heck LG ThinQ?Vanderwaal: LG ThinQ is our artificial intelligence platform that allows not just individual devices to react to commands, but also takes user data, lifestyle data, and pulls them together to make consumers’ lives easier and more enjoyable. So how does this work?LG’s vision for AI takes what we call lifestyle data, and that’s going to allow us to look at things like how our products are used in the home. For example, what television shows you watch, how often you do laundry, what type of clothes do you wash, how often do you clean your home. All those are combined with both internal and outside environmental factors to learn what users’ specific circumstances really are, and from there, offer proactive suggestions based on that user’s lifestyle.Does that mean you’re collecting our data?With LG, data privacy is extremely important to us, so the way that we’re protecting it is in a hybrid manner. So, their individual usage of that device is stored on the device only. But the aggregated data of how users use the device altogether is stored on a cloud. So always privacy is protected for the individual consumer. How else is LG protecting our information?Consumer data and the privacy to it is extremely important to LG. Everything is opt in. 85 Photos Post a comment Why should consumers care about AI?The challenge with all of us who are trying to explain artificial intelligence to consumers is what are the benefits? We’ll use a lot of use cases to actually show consumers what kind of lifestyle benefits they’ll see when they use artificial intelligence. Like what?A great example of ThinQ platform is understanding that a consumer washes clothes every Saturday. By knowing every Saturday, the AI platform, called LG ThinQ, is gradually accumulating what the behavior is and offering suggestions for how to get better washing.Is this all just a gimmick?With LG, we’re trying to make artificial intelligence relevant. Because right now, there’s a lot of artificial intelligence that consumers are using and not even knowing it. So we’re trying to make it simple to understand and show the benefits of why artificial intelligence will help products. And to communicate the idea of products communicating with one another. CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show. CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. Artificial intelligence (AI) LGlast_img read more

Huge leaps in AI have made facial recognition smarter than your brain

first_imgPropelling the spread of facial recognition systems are huge leaps in artificial intelligence, the technology that seeks to give computers some of the ability, versatility and even creativity of human thinking. The biggest improvements have come through a specific area of AI called neural networks, inspired by the actual workings of human brain cells. Hardware and software improvements enabled an approach called deep learning — multiple layers of digital neurons that provide increasingly refined image analysis. Overall, it’s a profound change. Recognizing and interpreting human faces is so important to us that whole sections of our brains are devoted to it. As we teach computers those skills, our interactions with them become more convenient — less like submitting database commands and more like dealing with the natural world in which we evolved. On the flip side, facial recognition can undercut privacy as our anonymity evaporates. How neural networks work In a training phase, neural networks scrutinize vast numbers of images of faces, learning on their own what’s important in the recognition process. It’s more accurate than the old way, with programmers describing what eyes, noses and mouths look like. “Some layers capture color and texture and gradients,” said Amit Roy-Chowdhury, chair of electrical and computer engineering at the University of California, Riverside. “As you go deeper, they capture the shape of different parts of the object and ultimately the shape of the object itself.” Facial recognition: Your face, your passwordThis is part of a CNET special report exploring the benefits and pitfalls of facial recognition.After training, neural networks create a stripped-down mathematical representation for each face. That representation can be compared rapidly with those of other faces, letting a facial recognition system decide if a person entering an office is on an authorized employee list or raise an alert when a potential shoplifter also appears on police arrest records. To work well, facial recognition systems need images with well-illuminated, clear faces that give a neural network detailed, accurate data. That’s why passport photos require even lighting, plain backgrounds, neutral expressions and subjects facing straight toward the camera. “You try to make your input as consistent as possible so your analysis can be easier,” said Raj Minhas, leader of Xerox’s PARC Interaction and Analytics Lab. Errors in the system Facial recognition systems are getting better, but can still return errors. False positives match a face when no match should exist, such as when a person’s image isn’t in the database. A false negative occurs when the system misses a match it should have made. Top-notch facial recognition systems today are 99.7 percent accurate with good lighting conditions, a 2018 study from the National Institute of Standards and Technology found. One way to reduce errors is to tune the system by pushing some of the data apart to make it clearer for the neural net, reducing the likelihood of a false positive, said Marios Savvides, director of the CyLab Biometrics Center at Carnegie Mellon University. Savvides’ team is also blending modern AI with an older approach called correlation filters that allows neural networks to improve facial recognition accuracy when faces are obscured, poorly lit or facing away from the camera. Overall, Savvides’ team is able to reconstruct faces even when they’re looking away or obscured by breathing masks, he said. “We live in a time where AI can surpass the human brain’s capability,” he said. Another way to improve facial recognition is to pair it with other attributes, such as fingerprints, voice prints and other biometric data, or factors such as passwords. That might not work well when a system is just scanning people walking into a store, but it’s pretty common for controlled situations where people are logging into a network. Artificial intelligence (AI) Laptops Tech Industry Security 16 Share your voice Facial recognition: Get to know the tech that gets to… Comments Now playing: Watch this: Royal Caribbean Cruises has begun using facial recognition systems to speed passengers on their way through security and ID checks. Royal Caribbean Cruises You and your family are at the pier, giddy to board the massive cruise ship docked nearby. Ahead lies a week of sunny beaches, indulgent buffet feasts and lounging around doing absolutely nothing. And then you see the long lines for security, baggage and ID checks. It often takes 75 minutes for passengers to check in, but the Pool Deck looks a lifetime away. Royal Caribbean Cruises thinks it has the answer to getting passengers aboard faster: AI-powered facial recognition. In December, passengers started taking part in a pilot program at a company embarkation point in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Passengers take selfies with the company’s app, then at the port, an AI-powered database matches their faces. After a quick double-check, Royal Caribbean’s staff members direct guests to their cabins. The result: all-time high customer satisfaction. “We wanted to turn what was a cold transaction into a really welcoming moment,” said Jay Schneider, who runs the Miami company’s digital operations. The goal is to get passengers “from car to bar in 10 minutes.” Royal Caribbean Cruises is hardly alone. Facial recognition technology is used to spot friends on Facebook and unlock your iPhone. It’s been rolled out in airports, at cash registers and on home security systems. It may soon be inescapable. We live in a time where AI can surpass the human brain’s capability. Marios Savvides, director of the CyLab Biometrics Center at Carnegie Mellon University 5:11 Tags “We call it irrefutable identity,” said Vishal Gupta, chief technology officer at Unisys, which sells biometric authentication technology to the US Customs and Border Protection agency, among other customers. Unisys’ facial recognition system alone is 99 percent accurate, but with an approach it calls fusion that blends in other biometric factors, the company reaches 99.9 percent or 99.99 percent accuracy. Facial recognition promises convenience, but it isn’t without concerns. Privacy advocates worry it will usher in an era of Big Brother monitoring or companies secretly tracking you. It also raises questions about AI bias; if you train a system using images of mostly white people, a common practice, the system might have difficulty recognizing people of color. Bias can creep into data sets in other ways, too, based on the data sets that are used to train the AI. If the photos used to train an AI show women cooking, the system might automatically conclude that women are likely to be in the kitchen. “There’s no good way to know your data set is biased until you notice it failing,” said Broad Daylight security consultant Nick Merrill. “And by the time a biased algorithm wreaks real-world havoc, it’s too late.” Still, many companies are thinking about how to use facial recognition to enhance the experience of their customers, visitors, patients and guests. They want facial recognition to make interactions easier, not creepy. Hello, hospital Northwell Health, which serves 3.5 million patients and is the largest health care provider in New York, is using a facial recognition program to streamline patient visits, reduce clerical errors and ultimately improve health. Its system, whose hardware and software are made by RightPatient, uses sophisticated cameras that photograph faces and irises of patients. When a patient arrives for a checkup, the receptionist’s computer confirms the patient’s identity and pulls up his or her chart for the doctor. If there’s no record, the patient is enrolled with an ID check. We’re literally putting a face with a name. Laura Semlies, vice president, Northwell Health The system offers a number of advantages besides a smoother arrival in an office with less fumbling for ID. It’s less susceptible to problems of duplicate records for the same patient. If you’re already in the system, it’ll recognize you even if you got married and changed your name. Identity theft — think people trying to snatch prescriptions — is reduced because you can’t fake a face. In emergencies like car accidents, the system would be able to identify an unconscious patient so that nurses and doctors could find medical histories and family contacts. “We’re literally putting a face with a name,” said Laura Semlies, vice president of digital patient experience. “It just makes for a better clinical relationship.” Biometric data is protected with encryption and is subject to the same strict privacy limits as other health data, she said. Only about 12,000 of Northwell’s 3.5 million patients are enrolled so far, but now the network is spreading it more broadly around its facilities. Facial recognition ahoy Royal Caribbean Cruises has twice as many passengers as Northwell has patients, and more of them, too, will see facial recognition as the program expands, project leader Schneider said. After finishing selfie and passport-scanning homework, passengers using the optional system can head to the port. As they arrive, passengers see a live view of themselves captured by cameras arrayed across the entrance. They’re arranged to avoid airport-style bottlenecks. Behind the scenes, a computer matches their faces to the ones on record. Once there’s a match, passengers see a green box around their faces on the screens. A human agent verifies the matches, greets the passengers by name and checks their passports. Royal Caribbean is required to have passenger photos, so the facial recognition system doesn’t significantly add to the data the company has. The company deletes passenger photos when the cruise ends, said Schneider, the cruise company’s digital chief. The result is a system that whisks passengers aboard and gets the holiday started more quickly than before. “Guests didn’t feel like they were on vacation until day 2,” Schneider said. “We wanted to give you that day back.” Originally published at 5:00 a.m. PT.last_img read more

Scientists propose a new type of dark matter and how we can

first_imgA simulation of dark matter filaments across the universe.  Zarija Lukic/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Dark matter is an enigmatic beast. We can’t see it, yet we know it makes up most of our universe. Finding the mysterious particle (or particles) the exotic matter is composed of has puzzled and intrigued scientists for decades. On June 6 at the Planck 2019 conference, an international meeting highlighting frontier physics research, John Terning and Christopher Verhaaren, theoretical physicists at the University of California, Davis, presented a new theory for what makes up dark matter and how we might detect it. A preprint paper of their study was uploaded to the arXiv directory on May 31. Dark matter and dark energy, two theoretical forms of matter, are thought to make up more than 85% of the known universe. When we look out into space, the evidence for the existence of dark matter is plentiful — we can see the effect it has on gravity and the expansion of the universe. We know something, an invisible particle perhaps, is lurking out of sight and responsible for the way our universe works. Scientists have long struggled to find the elusive, exotic particle that makes up dark matter, and more theories abound every year. In December, an Oxford scientist proposed that the universe was made up of a dark fluid. Others have suggested hunting for dark matter in cutting-edge new ways. Still, we have failed to detect it.Which brings us to Terning and Verhaaren’s idea. They argue for a new “type” of dark matter and a way to detect it, a one-two punch of theory and experimental validation. However, the authors of the study caution that verifying it could take quite some time. The new type of dark matter is different from previous theories, which suggest the exotic, invisible particles may be made up of weakling interacting massive particles, or WIMPs. No experiments have been able to find these particles, though scientists have built large, shielded laboratories that hope to reveal them. “We still don’t know what dark matter is,” said Terning in a press release. “The primary candidate for a long time was the WIMP, but it looks like that’s almost completely ruled out.”   The private rocket company trying to send Australia to… See SLAC, a two-mile particle accelerator next to Stanford 2 3:17 Share your voice Commentscenter_img The researchers looked at an opposing theory for dark matter with an equally fantastical name: “dark electromagnetism.” It says there’s a subatomic particle known as a dark photon which sometimes interacts with regular photons that we can already detect. The duo added their own spin to the idea by showing dark matter might be caused by “dark monopoles,” which are based on quantum theory.It all gets very tangled here, especially for us mere mortals struggling with everyday physics. The bottom line? We’ve got a new theory which proposes the “dark monopole” could be detected in an experiment thanks to its interactions with regular photons and the Aharonov-Bohm effect, which has been proven experimentally. However, the observable effect would be incredibly small — even smaller than gravitational waves — and we don’t yet have the technology to detect such minute signals right now. Alan Duffy, a dark matter researcher at Swinburne University in Australia, notes how the first detection of gravitational waves (itself only a theory until recently) took “a century of heroic scientific and engineering effort” suggesting that might be “a worry for the testability of the [new] prediction.”Where does that leave Terning and Verhaaren’s theory? Well, as a theory, of course. But that’s where all good science starts. Tags 33 Photos Now playing: Watch this: Sci-Techlast_img read more

India Ranks 142 in Ease of Doing Business Report Leads South Asia

first_imgA new World Bank Group report finds that India set the pace for regulatory reform in South Asia in 2013/14 India with 20 — the region’s largest reforms during the period.India was followed by Sri Lanka with 16 reforms while three countries — Bangladesh, Nepal, and Pakistan — focused their efforts on adopting modern electronic systems to facilitate business activity.The Doing Business 2015: Going Beyond Efficiency report released on Wednesday found that four of eight economies in South Asia implemented at least one regulatory reform making it easier for local entrepreneurs to do business in 2013/14.”Doing business is easier in economies with administrative efficiency and strong regulatory protections,” said Rita Ramalho, Doing Business report lead author, World Bank Group.The report noted that in India a little over a decade ago, an entrepreneur seeking a loan to grow his business would have had little luck, because financial institutions lacked access to information systems to assess creditworthiness.”Today, thanks to the creation and expansion of a national credit bureau offering credit scores and coverage on par with those in some high-income economies, a small business in India with a good financial history is more likely to get credit and hire more workers,” it said.Three of India’s regulatory reforms benefiting local entrepreneurs were in the areas of starting a business, getting electricity, and protecting minority investors, including through the adoption of the new Companies Act of 2013.India made starting a business easier by considerably reducing the registration fees, but also made it more difficult by introducing a requirement to file a declaration before the commencement of business operations, the report said.These changes apply to both Delhi and Mumbai. In addition, the electricity utility in Mumbai made getting electricity less costly by reducing the security deposit for a new connection.Finally, India strengthened minority investor protections by requiring greater disclosure of conflicts of interest by board members, increasing the remedies available in case of prejudicial related-party transactions, the report said.It also introduced additional safeguards for shareholders of privately held companies. This reform applies to both Delhi and Mumbai.This year, for the first time, Doing Business collected data for a second city in economies with a population of more than 100 million.In India, it now analyses business regulations in Delhi and Mumbai; in Bangladesh, in Chittagong and Dhaka; and in Pakistan, in Lahore and Karachi.The report covering 189 economies worldwide, found that Singapore tops the global ranking on the ease of doing business.Joining it on the list of the top 10 economies with the most business-friendly regulatory environments are New Zealand; Hong Kong SAR, China; Denmark; the Republic of Korea; Norway; the United States; the United Kingdom; Finland; and Australia.last_img read more

Photosharing app Snapchats parent company Snap hopes to raise 34 billion in

first_imgTouted as one of the biggest technology IPOs in the US since Alibaba, Snap — the parent company of the popular photo-sharing app Snapchat — has priced its initial public offering at $17 a share, hoping to raise nearly $3.4 billion, media reports said.Read: Snapchat parent Snap Inc files for $3 billion IPOSnap, with a reported market value of nearly $24 billion, was set to begin trading on the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday, Los Angeles Times reported late on Wednesday.Founded by college dropout Evan Spiegel, Snap Inc’s IPO is one of the high-profile stock debuts in the recent years along with Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba (that raised nearly $22 billion in 2014) and social media giant Facebook (which raised $16 billion in 2012).”Snap’s IPO has spurred great interest because few tech companies went public last year amid a shaky market, and none have debuted on the stock market this year,” the report said.”It’s also the first to go public among a class of companies, including Uber, Airbnb and Pinterest, that have been valued at more than $10 billion while still privately held,” it added.Launched in 2011, Snapchat currently has 158 million daily users.Snapchat aims to derive most of its revenue from advertising where it will compete against Google, Facebook and Twitter.Snap Inc recently rolled out major changes in its app that will make it easier to navigate the app with a universal search bar that’s always accessible at the top of the app.The much-anticipated video recording ‘Spectacles’ from Snapchat are also available online for users in the US at $129.99.Snapchat ‘Spectacles’ record video and pair to user’s phone over Bluetooth or WiFi which can then be uploaded to the user’s Snapchat account.According to reports, ‘Spectacles’ come with a charging case and cable in three shades including black, coral red and teal blue.last_img read more