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Hanley Wood Lays Off 19 Staffers

first_imgPrint still plays a role, but Hanley Wood has committed to a future based on digital media, data services and events. As such, the company is “shifting resources” toward those ends and away from print.The b-to-b publisher focused on the professional construction and design markets has laid off 19 employees from across various disciplines that will impact two of its top titles, Builder and Remodeling.CEO Peter Goldstone confirmed the moves in comments to FOLIO:.”[Hanley Wood] is making significant investments in digital and data solution platforms, increasing headcount across the board,” he says, noting that the company has made 70 hires in the last 12 months. “The shift in resource deployment is from print to digital and data. Our digital and data businesses are up 20 to 30 percent [year-over-year]. We are fueling the growth businesses with additional resources.” Goldstone says frequency and size of the print products will remain unchanged despite the cuts. Print and digital editorial operations began merging in 2011.”We are very committed to print as we still have over 20 print brands that are performing well against our core audience sectors,” he says. “Our core asset is our construction audience database. Print is still 50 percent of our overall media expense and critical to feeding the database.””Instead of wide and thin, which is the old magazine model,” Goldstone continues, “we are expanding vertically and deep within our core audiences. This specialization requires new talent and new skills and new training.”Hanley Wood has emphasized digital- and data-first approaches with several of its smaller brands and in many of its senior-level hires—the company brought on dedicated presidents of content, digital and market intelligence—but hadn’t made major changes to its primary print products until now.Two of the company’s three biggest magazines, Builder has a total qualified circulation of 111,716, while Remodeling has 102,035 qualified subscribers, according to the most recent BPA audits from the first half of 2013. The brands’ web properties attract 161,235 and 87,621 unique visitors each month, respectively, per their media kits.Broadly, the titles’ sector has declined, but is slightly outperforming industry averages in ad pages and ad revenue, according to the latest BIN report from ABM. Building, engineering and construction magazines declined 5.9 percent in pages and 3.7 percent in revenue through the first quarter of 2013.The layoffs are the latest in a series of changes Hanley Wood has undergone as it transforms its business model. The company has been sold twice since 2005 and drastically reduced its debt through restructuring early 2012. Goldstone, who had been president of Hanley Wood from 2009 to 2010, was named CEO last year.**Editor’s note: A prior version of this article incorrectly stated that Goldstone had served as Hanley Wood’s CEO from 2009 to 2010.last_img read more

Using fourdimensional electron microscopy to track diffusion of nanoparticles in a liquid

first_img Combining pulsed laser with electron gun allows for capturing fast motion of nanoparticles in a liquid PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Journal information: Science Advances This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: Using four-dimensional electron microscopy to track diffusion of nanoparticles in a liquid (2017, August 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-four-dimensional-electron-microscopy-track-diffusion.html A team of researchers at Caltech has developed a way to capture on film the superfast propulsive motion of Brownian objects, particularly those at the nanoscale. In their paper published on the open-access site Science Advances, the team describes using four-dimensional electron microscopy techniques to capture real-time imagery of gold nanoparticles as they diffused in a liquid.center_img Play Tracing photoinduced nanoparticle diffusion. Credit: Xuewen Fu 4D imaging of nanoparticle diffusion in liquid. Credit: Xuewen Fu More information: Xuewen Fu et al. Photoinduced nanobubble-driven superfast diffusion of nanoparticles imaged by 4D electron microscopy, Science Advances (2017). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1701160 Tiny particles suspended in hot liquid are observed to move in a seemingly random fashion. Such movement was noted by Robert Brown in the early 19th century, a phenomenon thus called Brownian motion. In more recent times, researchers have focused on Brownian motion as it relates to even smaller particles—micro and nano particles. Unfortunately, due to technological limitations, it was previously impossible to capture the action on film—instead, researchers have pieced together stills taken using an electron microscope. In this new effort, the researchers report on a technique they have developed that overcomes this problem, offering a new way to study diffusion of extremely tiny particles.The new approach involves the use of four-dimensional microscopy, which entails using both extremely fast laser pulses and transmission electron microscopy—it is based, the researchers note, on a pump-probe working mechanism. The first of two lasers excites the particles, while the second takes a picture of the action—it happens so quickly that the results can be viewed as video.In their experiments, the researchers fired a first pulse at gold nanoparticles, then fired a second pulse that captured images of tiny bubbles forming near the surface of the nanoparticles and exciting them. Increasing the energy of the first pulse, the team noted, resulted in merging many of the tiny bubbles, causing different types of movement by the nanoparticles. The researchers suggest their technique could be used by other researchers to study dispersion systems, particularly those that are out of equilibrium. It could also lead the way, perhaps, to the development of light-powered nanorobots working inside liquid systems. Play Results of nanoparticle experiment. Credit: Xuewen Fu © 2017 Phys.orglast_img read more