June 2021

England and Scotland draw in Six Nations closer

first_imgThe Calcutta Cup finishes at 38-38, the first draw between the pair since 2010. What a finish to the Six Nations.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Retained trophy: Scotland keep the Calcutta Cup after the draw (Getty Images) center_img Youngs thought he might have got the bonus-point score just before the 20 minute-mark,  after chasing the ball into the Scots’ in-goal, but he knocked on. But ten minutes later Jonny May was streaking in for score number four. Farrell converted all four tries.First of two: Darcy Graham gets his first score (Getty Images)At this point the bookies shifted the odds for an England win to 500-1.But Scotland started their comeback from a blocked Owen Farrell kick. Captain Stuart McInally charged down and then ran all the way in from just inside England’s half.England were kept on the pitch at half-time and it all felt so predictable.It was anything but.The second half started with another Scots try, with Darcy Graham going over. Then everything kicked into gear. Ali Price collected his own kick and fed an on-rushing Magnus Bradbury who scored Scotland’s third. Graham got the bonus-point score, his second, from a set play and then man of the match Finn Russell reeled in an intercept off of Farrell and galloped in for a converted score to make it 31-all.They think it’s all over: Scotland celebrate the score to make it 38-31 (Getty Images)Then the Scots pulled in front Russell drew the defence and with the English expecting the drift, the fly-half gave a short pass to Johnson on the in-line and the centre hammered home for Scotland’s sixth try, with just a few minutes to go. It was Scotland’s fifth try in the second half.If they had held on it would have been a first Scotland win in London since 1984, but with Ford’s late score under the posts it ended all square. It was the first draw between he rivals since 2010. England and Scotland draw in Six Nations closerWhat a heart-stopper.The game may not have counted for much, with Wales claiming the Six Nations title earlier in the day, but no one told England and Scotland men who put on a try-fest as they drew the Calcutta Cup 38-38, ending this season’s tournament in style.Related: Wales win the Grand SlamScotland were 31-0 down in the first half, but came roaring back to lead 38-31 with just a few minutes left on the clock after a well-taken Sam Johnson try. They thought they were in for their first win at Twickenham in 36 years, but with England hammering the line, sub George Ford finally went under the posts and converted his own try to spare English blushes and salvage a draw.Scotland retain the Calcutta Cup after this 11-try thriller. It was the highest-scoring draw in Test history.England scored their first try in only a minute. With  Johnson shooting out of the Scottish line, England’s backs ruthlessly exploited the gap. With Elliot Daly ghosting into the line, Henry Slade took the ball off him and fed it to Jack Nowell, who stepped off his wing and cantered in to score.Their second came after a quick lineout drive – thrown straight to Billy Vunipola – caught the Scots unaware, and they trudged over the try line for a Tom Curry score.The pack were to the fore again for the third England score, with Ellis Genge (on for Ben Moon very early) taking the ball in traffic, eyeing half a gap and then offloading to tighthead Kyle Sinckler on the charge. One pass from Ben Youngs to Joe Launchbury sent the lock over for another score.last_img read more

Rugby World Cup – Earthquakes

first_img Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Rugby World Cup – EarthquakesThe Rugby World Cup is currently taking place in Japan to much pomp and ceremony. Several matches have been played but there are plenty more to go at 12 locations from Hokkaido in the North to the subtropical isle of Okinawa in the South.Organisers have said over 400,000 travelling fans are expected to travel and if they’ve done their homework, they’ll be well-versed that Japan is located at the junction of four tectonic plates and riddled with faults that make earthquakes a daily occurrence for the island’s 127m inhabitants.In fact, there have been 13 earthquakes measuring over 5.0 on the Richter Scale since the mega-earthquake of Tohoku of 2011, but such is Japan’s expenditure on building infrastructure that the death toll has been relatively modest, with 108 people losing their lives.In 2011, at 9.01 on the Richter scale, the Great East Japan Earthquake was one of the five largest earthquakes ever recorded. Nearly 20,000 people lost their lives, and Australia’s World Cup finalist Scott Fardy, playing the country at the time, took part in the rescue effort.Indeed, given its precarious location, Japan equates for 20 per cent of the world’s earthquakes with over 1,000 tremors-a-day registered on Japan’s Shindo scale but that shouldn’t put rugby fans off heading there for the Rugby World Cup. Far from it but they should be prepared for any eventuality. Prepared: Tokyo and other host venues are well versed in preparing for earthquakes (Getty Images) Rugby World Cup Fixtures The 2023 Rugby World… Rugby World Cup Venues Collapse Expand Rugby World Cup Venues Expand What you need to know about the 12… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, and Twitter. So what should fans expect? In Japan it’s routine to house a basic survival kit with a flashlight, radio, first aid kit and enough food and water to last a few days. Wherever fans are staying it’s also sensible to find out where the designated evacuation area lies in the neighbourhood. If you are caught in an earthquake, the advice is to place yourself under a doorway or table, watch out for breaking glass and avoid running outside. If it’s been a serious quake, it’s prudent to turn off stoves, ovens and the building’s main gas supply.Depending where you’re staying, the area can be at risk from a Tsunami in the coastal areas or landslides in mountainous climes. September and October, when the tournament is in full swing, is prone to tropical cyclones and 12 months ago an earthquake measuring 6.7 hit Hokkaido near the city of Sapporo where England will be based later this year, killing 40 people. World Rugby hopes Lady Luck is on its side.The organisers are, understandably, putting in contingency plans for the loss of team hotels, transport hubs and training grounds and the possibility of moving fixtures but they are confident Japan will be able to cope with any natural disaster in the safest way possible to avoid disruption.Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Rugby World Cup Winners Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 We take a quick tour through the history… Owain Jones takes a look at some of the possible risks involved with the Rugby World Cup taking place in Japan. Rugby World Cup Winnerslast_img read more

Concerns over Fukuoka pitch at Rugby World Cup

first_imgFinally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Concerns over Fukuoka pitch at Rugby World CupDuring its first outing at the Rugby World Cup, for Italy’s win over Canada, Fukuoka Hakatanomori Stadium’s pitch wasn’t holding up. Then during France 33-9 USA the turf was ripping up again.With Ireland versus Samoa coming up in Fukuoka at 11.45am on Saturday 12 October, concerns are starting to be raised about whether the field will hold up for such an important match.For the second game there, the ground staff had to replace a 12m strip of turf. However, as the game wore on, the wear and tear was noticeable all over the park. At set-piece time, and even in open play, dirt was sent flying and some players lost their footing on the run.Spraying dirt: the Eagles attempt to tackle Sofiane Guitoune of France (Getty Images)After the match ended with a bonus-point win for France, some of the players were asked about the surface. USA hooker Dylan Fawsitt was pragmatic, saying: “Facilities in Japan have just been phenomenal, so I won’t say a bad word about any of it. It was a bit choppy on the pitch but it’s not something that affected the play in the game. I thought the standard of rugby today was quite high.”However, France prop Cyril Baille was not so magnanimous, saying: “It was very tough, very difficult. When scrummaging the ground would come up, it wasn’t firm, and it was hard when trying to push.”Uneven footing: USA wing Martin Iosefo kicks (Getty Images)Eyes now turn to the next fixture in Fukuoka, with two physical sides in Ireland and Samoa set to do battle in the ultra-competitive Pool A. As you can see, plenty of others are concerned about the state of that pitch. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSSkip AdAds by But the pitch was in a  bad way in that first game, for Italy and Canada, and people definitely noticed… This pitch is cutting up horribly – even for a rugby match! #FRAUSA #RWC2019— Stewart Ashmore (@Ashy10) October 2, 2019 Shocking pitch at Fukuoka. Won’t take a scrum, cutting up in tackles in only 10 mins #ITAvCAN— 🅽🅳🆈 🅵🆁🅸🆉🆉🅴🅻🅻 (@AndrewJFrizzell) September 26, 2019 The turf tore up in the first two games at the Fukuoka Hakatanomori Stadium – and Ireland v Samoa is yet to come there Looks like this pitch in Fukuoka has a touch of the Nematodes #RWC2019 #ItalyvCanada— keith bradshaw (@Ayton1Keith) September 26, 2019Related: A guide to the Rugby World Cup venuesRugby World Cup say of the ground in their official guide: “Surrounded by green, verdant forest and on the very doorstep of the wonderfully cosmopolitan yet laidback southern city of Fukuoka, Fukuoka Hakatanomori Stadium will be an incredible venue from which to enjoy some cracking Rugby World Cup 2019 action. Being a compact and intimate venue and a purpose-built rectangular stadium, fans will enjoy being close to the on-field action, and close to the city of Fukuoka in order to enjoy the pre and post-match atmosphere back in town.”Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.last_img read more

New life, light for Tiffany windows

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET May 15, 2012 at 6:27 pm Need link to Gabriel’s Place. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY stanley hirsch says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Janet Kawamoto says: Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL Gillian Thompson, a conservator who works with the Cincinnati Art Museum, and a member of Christ Church Cathedral, carefully cleans the Tiffany stained glass window. Photo/Julie Murray[Diocese of Southern Ohio] Four rare Tiffany stained glass windows have a new home: the Cincinnati Art Museum will unveil them this month as part of a new and permanent exhibit.The windows, badly in need of repair and conservation, were removed in 2010 from the former St. Michaels & All Angels church in urban Cincinnati and sold to the art museum. Proceeds supported the founding of a community ministry that is now housed at the Avondale facility. Gabriel’s Place seeks to encourage community-based enterprise. The urban center operates a community garden and kitchen, as well as a hoop house that provides fish and fresh produce for local businesses and residents.“Gabriel’s Place is a gem in the middle of Avondale,” said the Rev. Canon Anne Reed, canon for mission for the Diocese of Southern Ohio. “The ministry began with collaboration among 10 community partners, and that partnership is growing every week. The remaining stained glass windows in the former church building remind us of the sense of the sacred as Gabriel’s Place continues to grow as a center for physical, social and spiritual health.”This has been “a fun and exciting project,” said Megan Emery, the museum’s associate conservator of objects. “Getting the windows from any religious setting would have been special, but it’s been exciting to see what’s happening in the church building with Gabriel’s Place. It’s really special for us to know that we’re tied into that mission.”Coincidentally, along with Emery, who is a member of Christ Church Cathedral, Amy Dehan, the museum’s curator of decorative arts and design, and Gillian Thompson, a stained glass conservator contracted for the project, are Episcopalians as well. Thompson attends the cathedral, while Dehan is a member of St. Timothy’s, Anderson Township.Commissioned around 1900, three of the windows honor the Mitchell family, parishioners and owners of a large furniture manufacturing business. One of the windows shows Christ, while the others depict angels. The purchase of the windows was made possible by the diocese and four donors: the Gardner Family 1992 Charitable Lead Trust, The Oliver Family Foundation, the Cincinnati Art Museum’s Docent Organization, and an anonymous donor.The stained glass windows complement an existing collection at the art museum of Tiffany’s blown glass vases. About 30 early examples of Tiffany vases will join the stained glass exhibit, located on the second floor of the museum’s great hall.“Tiffany’s work is so important to the history of glass,” said Dehan. Before Tiffany, most stained glass windows were flat sheets of transparent glass cut in shapes, then painted with designs or an illustration. Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of the Tiffany & Co. founder, experimented with glass, employing different techniques to “paint pictures using only glass and light.”Tiffany windows often have three or four different types of glass. For example, the folds of an angel’s robe may have drapery glass, which has been manipulated and folded when in a molten form to create folds and rolls. To create even more dimension for areas like the horizons, Tiffany windows may have up to five layers of different colors and textures of glass.Conservation for the windows took 17 months of painstaking work, disassembling and cleaning hundreds of pieces of glass, making repairs and building new frames. Emery has documented each stage of the conservation work. While restoration tries to make things look as good as possible, conservation focuses both on the past – the original intent and context – as well as on the future and preservation.Although thousands of windows were commissioned from Tiffany in the late 1800s and early 1900s, more than half have been lost and destroyed, Dehan said.“We are always looking to acquire and hold for the community the best examples of art that we have,” said Dehan. “We were thrilled when this unfolded. It adds such a dimension to what we can tell about Tiffany. It also reflects upon Cincinnati and the city’s commitment to art.”Dehan added that because the exhibit will be permanent, thousands of people will have the opportunity to experience and be inspired by the beautiful windows.With light shining through the windows, she said, “they will appear in the same way Tiffany planned for them to look.”— Richelle Thompson is director of communications for the Diocese of Southern Ohio. Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA ‘Poor Man’s Bible’While colored glass dates to ancient times, stained glass as a form of art and storytelling became prominent in the Middle Ages. A largely illiterate population could learn about the stories of the Bible from the illustrations in the stained glass windows. Some have called these windows the “Poor Man’s Bible,” because they, along with carvings, paintings and mosaics, could translate the narratives of the Bible to a population that couldn’t read.A 12th-century German monk named Theophilus wrote about stained glass in medieval times in his text, “On Diverse Arts.” The basic ingredients for making glass, he explained, are sand and wood ash (potash). After the mixture is melted into a liquid, it cools into glass. While it’s still molten, color can be added or the glass can be blown or molded into different shapes.In the late 1870s, Louis Comfort Tiffany studied new techniques for making stained glass windows. Early in his career, he used cheap jelly jars and bottles because he liked how the mineral impurities changed the shape, texture and color of the glass. When he couldn’t find the types of glass he wanted, Tiffany started his own glass factory. He used glass that was opalescent, meaning it changed colors as it transmitted light. Instead of painting on the glass, Tiffany simulated the folds of a robe or the texture of grass by molding and cutting glass in new ways.Windows from Tiffany Studios adorn churches, museums and fine homes around the country. Several Episcopal churches in the Diocese of Southern Ohio have beautiful Tiffany windows.MakingStained glass windows start as a drawing or cartoon. After the design is approved, it is drawn to scale on paper and the design is traced onto a glass easel. Another copy of the drawing is cut into pieces and used as patterns to cut the glass. The pieces of glass are dabbed with hot wax and then posted onto the glass easel. This way the designer can see how the light looks through the glass. After all glass pieces are cut, the artist joins them using copper foil and channeled lead caning. Finally, the windows are framed and hung.ConservingCleaning the glass requires care and time. Conservators use cotton swabs with an ethanol and deionized water compound to clean off the soot and grime. (Many of these windows were placed in churches and facilities that used coal and/or wood fires for heat). It can take two or more weeks to clean the top layer of one side of the window. Then the conservator flips it over and begins again.After the exterior layers are clean, the conservator disassembles the window, carefully scraping out the old grout and opening up the metal caming to remove pieces of glass one by one. Broken glass is repaired, when possible, with a special epoxy injected through a syringe. As each layer of glass is removed, the cleaning continues.After all the pieces are cleaned and repaired, rebuilding begins. All of the glass is placed back within its caming, and new solder¬ing is done when necessary. In this case, carpenters constructed new wooden frames for the window as well.Sources: Cincinnati Art Museum, Wikipedia, the Metropolitan Museum of Art websites.Visit the exhibitThe Tiffany stained glass windows and vases exhibit opens May 12 at the Cincinnati Art Museum. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free (parking is $4). The museum is located at 953 Eden Park Drive, Cincinnati. Visit www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cheryl Filippone says: Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs July 31, 2012 at 3:58 am My mother just recently bought a victorian mansion built in 1901 in Trenton, New Jersey. It actually has been the home to the Bishop of the Catholic Church for the past 100 years. In the house, as you walk up the main stairwell, straight ahead is a very large window made of stained glass. The depiction of the stained glass resembles the work of Tiffany. Is there any way I can find out if it is in fact a Tiffany work of art? The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments (3) Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New life, light for Tiffany windows Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By Richelle ThompsonPosted May 4, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY May 16, 2012 at 2:07 am Here’s the link: http://gabrielsplace.diosohio.org/. We’ve added it to the text above, too. Thanks for pointing that out.Janet KawamotoAssociate Editor, Episcopal News Service Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

Gender identity should not be basis for exclusion, bishops agree

first_img July 9, 2012 at 11:37 am As a life-long Episcopalian, I am appalled at the amount of time we, as a community in Christ, spend judging and rejecting. The Golden Rule says, “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” It does not read, “Love thy neighbor as thyself as long as they are like you.” Jesus embraced all people as his own kin. Should we not do the same? Should we not spend more time spreading the true Christian messages of love, charity and hope?The bottom line: what would Jesus counsel us to do? Hate and deny? Or love and accept?Jane RichterDiocese of San Joaquin Rector Shreveport, LA July 8, 2012 at 10:49 pm You can watch “Voices of Witness: Out of the Box” on YouTube here:Susan RussellDiocese of Los Angeles [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] In a busy legislative day, the House of Bishops on July 7 adopted legislation that would amend two canons to prohibit discrimination based on “gender identity or expression” in the lay and ordained ministry discernment process and in the overall life, worship and governance of the Episcopal Church. The House of Deputies would need to concur for the legislation to pass at General Convention.For the Rev. Carolyn Woodall of the Diocese of San Joaquin, who observed the deliberations from the gallery, the passage of resolutions D002 and D019 would mean, at long last, inclusion.“I am pleased that these resolutions did pass in that they have the very significant effect of validating, in the eyes of the church, the humanity of those who are transgender,” said Woodall after the bishops’ actions. “We are greatly misunderstood and there is a widespread lack of knowledge about what it means to be transgender.”The Rev. Susan Russell, a deputy from the Diocese of Los Angeles and a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender activist, agreed.“The resolutions passed today in the House of Bishops bring us another step closer to making all the sacraments available to all the baptized,” Russell said in an email to ENS.“The courageous witness of our transgender brothers and sisters has been an extraordinary gift to the church as we continue to grow in understanding and appreciation of the diversity of God’s beloved human family. I look forward to the House of Deputies concurring on these resolutions and empowering our witness to the world, that when we say ‘the Episcopal Church welcomes you’ we really mean it.”Bishop Chet Talton of San Joaquin, who ordained Woodall to the vocational diaconate a few months ago, addressed the house during deliberations. The ordination, he said, “was wonderfully received. The person entered the ordination process and proceeded through that process without any regard really for her gender, but because she obviously possessed the qualities that lent themselves to the ministry of the diaconate to which she was ordained,” he said.“There are such people in our church. I certainly see them when I move around our congregations,” Talton said. “Their presence and access to the ordination process ought to be affirmed in a way that this proposed change indicates.”Bishop Gene Robinson of New Hampshire reminded bishops to view “Out of the Box, a moving and compelling story” about five transgender people, including Woodall.“This resolution talks about access to the ordination process. It does not command anyone to affirm anyone in the ordination process but does say that all members of this church, including those whose gender identity and expression are perhaps different from the norm, have that access,” he said.Bishop Andrew Waldo of the Diocese of Upper South Carolina opposed D019, seeking clarification of “gender expression … to get a sense of how the people in my diocese who have a poor understanding of what transgender means.“I believe we need to have more discussion in the church, in our congregations, in order to be able to speak in a way that is theologically sound, that gives a deeper understanding of what it means to be a transgender person,” he said.Robinson said, “I’m still learning about this as well. My understanding is that gender identity has to do with the gender that a particular individual identifies with and in some cases it does not agree with the physical manifestations of sexuality that that person has been born with. Some make the very courageous choice of choosing to take on the expression of that gender identity.“And some of them, although not all of them, choose to have changes made in their physical bodies to match that gender identity. What we are saying in this resolution is that such gender identity and gender expressions should not stand in the way of someone having access to an equal place in the life and worship and governance of this church.”Bishop Mark Lawrence of the Diocese of South Carolina also opposed the measure, saying “we are entering into a time of individualized eros … the freedom of every individual to self-define every aspect of who they are in such a way that we no longer have any kinds of norms. We are entering into the chaos of individuality. It’s an idol that will break us.”Bishop Marc Andrus of the Diocese of California said the confusion about gender expression “to me is an excellent reason to pass this resolution. This resolution is meant to protect people when there is confusion around a minority in our culture – that is precisely the time we put protection around them.”The bishops also adopted an amended version of Resolution A144, an anti-racism measure that authorizes the Office of Pastoral Development to monitor the episcopal process and report to Executive Council the ratio of ethnic and female to male bishop nominees and electees.Bishop George Councell of New Jersey supported the legislation, amended to include the word ‘nominees’ as well as ‘electees.’ “The sign says ‘the Episcopal Church welcomes you,’ but I think too often it means, if you look like us and sound like us and care to become like us, you’d be welcome here,” he said. “I am worried about the distortions, of what creeps in for me as a member of the majority culture.”In other action, the bishops approved legislation to: establish a church-wide development office (D025); reaffirm their commitment to the Millennium Development Goals (A011); adopt a substitute resolution asking Program Budget and Finance (PBF) to consider allocating $40,000 to continue a task force and resources for older adult ministries (A153); establish the church as a moral voice of health care (A040); and adopted an amended resolution calling for a churchwide response to bullying.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori called Resolution D020, which asks the church to recognize and encourage the elders of Christ Episcopal Church, Red Shirt Table and the Tribal Council in the Oglala Lakota District in the Diocese of South Dakota in their preparation and planning of an ecumenical reconciliation event planned for 2014.“It is phenomenal reality that a number of Taize brothers are going to come from France to the Oglala band for a reconciliation event on a reservation. It is a very profound event.”Bishop John Tarrant of South Dakota told the house that two young people from the diocese currently are serving as interns within the Taize community. “We are in the process of profoundly changing not the culture from a native standpoint but the culture of the diocese as it focuses more and more on youth and young adult ministry. We really put this forth as a way of putting this in front of the Episcopal Church.”There was passionate debate about Resolution D003 that calls for “gun-free zones.”Bishop Eugene Sutton of Maryland thanked the house for their support after a diocesan priest and parish administrator died in gun violence May 3, when a disturbed homeless man shot them and took his own life.“This is the society in which we live and we have to figure out a way to protect those who are on the front lines of ministry … who receive and help people whom our government thinks of increasingly as throwaway people.”Bishop Jeffrey Lee of Chicago said the measure may seem like a token gesture “but it’s a token of something profoundly important. We are living in Chicago with an undeclared epidemic of gun violence. In the last three days 20 people have been shot, three children have died. Since 2008, 650 children and teenagers have died on the streets of Chicago from gun violence. We have to pass this and do anything we can do to end the glamor of gun violence in this country.”Bishops also supported legislation expressing solidarity with indigenous people (A131) and endorsing statehood for the District of Columbia (C033); restoring the Episcopal Network for Economic Justice (C078); and an amended version of A076, strengthening small congregations.Also, Bishop David Bailey of Navajoland was elected to serve on Executive Council.–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Washington, DC By Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 7, 2012 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (8) Featured Events Jane Richter says: Samuel V. Wilson, Jr. says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. Steven Long says: Submit a Press Release Brad Ems says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 9, 2012 at 11:04 am Welcome to the theatre of the absurd. This kind of stuff is driving people out of the church. What’s also surprising is that they took the time to debate and pass this junk. The Bishop of S.C. is spot-on. Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 8, 2012 at 2:50 pm Few in the pews have any knowledge of the resolutions to be decided at GC, or the representatives appointed to represent them, or how the reps might vote on any issue. Few newcomers know that TEC was once a Christian church, or what the difference is. Few read the Bible for themselves, and what is read at Sunday service is edited (passages left out) to reflect the “new” understanding. Sin only means intolerance, and that only intolerance of the “old” understanding of sin. If this was what I encountered in 1957 when I was confirmed as an adult, I would have thought I had been cast into hell!How, HOW can such a small percentage of us sinners lead (no, push or pull) ALL into such a sorry state. So much to repent of…we’d better get started. Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Reverend Canon Susan Russell says: Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service July 8, 2012 at 11:04 am I am really confused. I don’t even understand half the terms flying around. Yet, I am a faithful, church-going Christian who conscientiously asks: “What is the loving thing to do?” Also, as a thinking Christian, I want my church to explain to me or help prepare me theologically to understand where it is leading me. Is this too much to ask? Otherwise, we run the risk of alienating people in the very process of “de-aleintating” others. It is a supreme irony. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls July 8, 2012 at 11:10 am Re quota watching on the episcopal selection and ordination process. Come on! If you are called, you are called. If you are discerned by others to be called, then you are a candidate. If you are elected, you are elected. Let God’s merit be sought, discerned, and acted upon. Leave the quotas, formulas, and presuppositions at home, everybody! Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA General Convention, Rector Tampa, FL Gender identity should not be basis for exclusion, bishops agree Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 8, 2012 at 9:22 pm “Turning and turning in the widening gyreThe falcon cannot hear the falconer;Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhereThe ceremony of innocence is drowned;The best lack all conviction, while the worstAre full of passionate intensity.”The Second Coming, YeatsThe last two lines, I think, answer your question, Maxine. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET General Convention 2012, July 9, 2012 at 10:00 am Regarding the statement by the Bishop of South Carolina, “we are entering into a time of individualized eros … the freedom of every individual to self-define every aspect of who they are in such a way that we no longer have any kinds of norms.” I’m pretty sure that we have the one norm that counts – the Christ in each and everyone of us. All the rest is a part of that human point of view that we are called to overcome.The Rev. Sharon GracenRector, Trinity Episcopal ChurcBranford, CT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Samuel V. Wilson, Jr. says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Human Sexuality Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Rev. Sharon Gracen says: Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS House of Bishops, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Maxine Schell says: last_img read more

Video: Reading Camp rocks kids’ worlds – and helps them…

first_img Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Video Comments are closed. Becky Searles says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ella goodpaster says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem December 4, 2013 at 3:39 pm I do love camp can’t what till my 3rd year as a caousler I love to be with the kids and it changed my life when I was a camper. What rocks ? READING ROCKS!!!!!! C.C. Johnson says: Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Video: Reading Camp rocks kids’ worlds – and helps them read better Whitney barger says: Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME December 3, 2013 at 5:30 pm As one who has been a part of Reading Camp for years, I can attest to the fact that lives are changed, hope has been born, and children who have been bullied because they were poor readers have discovered themselves and gained confidence. They realize they are not stupid…they just have a problem to solve. We now have former Campers who have returned as Counselors. That says something about this program, I think. It is a joy to work with the dedicated people who make Reading Camp happen. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal News Service – Pine Mountain, Kentucky] Being able to read well is a basic skill that not every young student masters. That lack of mastery can lead to a lifetime of low achievement – and poverty.That is the basic premise of Reading Camp, an 11-year-old ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Lexington. In addition to breaking the cycle of poverty by helping young children avoid a lifetime of illiteracy, the camps also aim to build self-confidence and teach campers about their local heritage. Thus, campers get a jump-start on being contributing members of their families and their communities.The Reading Camp ministry helps run camps all over the world and close to home. Each week-long camp, some of them sleep-away and some day camps, is built on a combination of interdisciplinary learning – sometimes masqueraded as play – and activities such as hikes, games and crafts. Staff members are all volunteers and serve in roles such as teachers, counselors, nurses and administrators. Some volunteers come back year after year.On Dec. 3, the Episcopal Church announced that the program had received $20,000 to further its work. The grant was one of nine Roanridge Trust Award Grants made for 2014.Recently, Episcopal News Service spent time at the annual Reading Camp held in the Appalachian Mountains of Kentucky at the Pine Mountain Settlement School. The school itself, founded in 1913 as boarding school for mountain children and as a settlement serving the community through economic, health and cultural initiatives, has for the last 30 years provided instruction in environmental education and traditional arts and culture to thousands of students.Alpha Sigma Tau sorority has supported the work of the Pine Mountain Settlement School since 1945 through financial donations as well as volunteer work. During this year’s Reading Camp, sorority collegiate and alumnae members were part of the volunteer staff, some of them for the first time.The 2013 Pine Mountain Reading Camp week was the last for then-Executive Director Allison Duvall before she joined the staff of Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM) as program manager for co-sponsorship and church relations. Michelle Sjogren of Lexington was recently called to be the new executive director of Reading Camp.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 3, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (4) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS December 4, 2013 at 9:42 am Being apart of reading camp has changed my life. I was once a camper and now I serve as a counselor. Since reading camp I have graduated high school early and I am currently attending college. It’s a great experience and I am proud to be apart of the reading camp team. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL December 6, 2013 at 9:32 am I volunteered 2 yrs ago for the 1st time, in Irvine, Ky. It was wonderful. Last summer, we had our 1st Reading Camp here in the Diocese of Western Michigan, with the help of the Dio. of Lexington. Although small, it was great! This summer, we hope to repeat that 1st one and begin at least 1 more, maybe 2. I would encourage everyone to get involved in some way. It’s the best thing for kids who have trouble with reading !!!!! Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

Se intensifican los esfuerzos contra la trata de personas en…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Lynette WilsonPosted Feb 3, 2014 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Se intensifican los esfuerzos contra la trata de personas en vísperas del Súper Tazón Los episcopales se unen a coaliciones interreligiosas Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Una enorme caja de regalos [GIFT box] de la ONU, que vista desde afuera pareciera que contiene un presente, pero que en su interior cuenta relatos de víctimas de la trata de personas, se exhibe en Broadway y la calle 17, frente a Union Square, en Nueva York, hasta el 2 de febrero. Esta suerte de instalación está auspiciada por el Comité contra la Trata de Personas, una ONG de Naciones Unidas. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.[Episcopal News Service] En los meses que anteceden al XLVIII [campeonato nacional de fútbol americano] Súper Tazón [Super Bowl], los episcopales de Nueva Jersey y otros estados vecinos han estado preparándose, no para el gran encuentro deportivo, sino por la fluencia de mujeres y niños que las autoridades advierten que ingresarán en la región como víctimas de explotación sexual.Las diócesis de Nueva Jersey y Newark han estado ofreciendo talleres y seminarios educativos en distintas iglesias a través del estado, dirigidos por episcopales como Louis Cavaliere, un capitán jubilado de la Armada de EE.UU. que se interesó en la trata de personas cuando tuvo conciencia de ella por el “lado de la demanda” [en términos de oferta y demanda] durante su tiempo en el servicio activo.“Yo enviaba hombres al extranjero, y participaban de esto”, dijo Cavaliere, miembro de la iglesia de La Gracia [Grace Church], en Merchantville, Nueva Jersey, en una entrevista telefónica.En 2000, Estados Unidos promulgó la Ley de Protección a las Víctimas de la Trata de Personas, que define la trata sexual como una “forma grave de tráfico”, en el cual “se induce por la fuerza, fraude o coerción, un acto sexual de carácter comercial”.En la Diócesis de Nueva Jersey, Cavaliere dio charlas en iglesias que se centraron en el problema de la trata de personas que tiene lugar al tiempo de gigantescos eventos deportivos tales como el Súper Tazón.“Un Súper Tazón tras otro ha demostrado ser uno de los mayores eventos del mundo donde la crueldad de la trata de personas dura varias semanas”, dijo Christopher H. Smith, representante por Nueva Jersey, en un artículo de la Associated Press sobre los esfuerzos del estado por reducir la trata de personas antes del Súper Tazón.Los Halcones Marinos [Seahawks] de Seattle y los Broncos de Denver jugarán el 2 de febrero en el Meadowlands, un estadio del norte de Nueva Jersey, en la Diócesis de Newark.“El Súper Tazón traerá acaso más pompa y glamur que ningún otro evento de que Nueva Jersey haya sido anfitrión. Y, tal como la historia del Súper Tazón ha demostrado, traerá más sufrimiento y oscuridad —en la forma de esclavitud humana— de lo que podamos llegar a medir”, dijo Mark Beckwith, obispo de Newark, en una columna de opinión publicada el 24 de enero en el Star-Ledger. “La mayoría de nosotros no veremos esta maldad. La mayoría de nosotros no sabremos si está ocurriendo en Newark o en Nutley, en Ho-Ho-Kus o en Hackensack, o en otros lugares intermedios. Cualquier testimonio que podamos dar, cualquier conciencia que podamos crear y cualquier luz que podamos arrojar tiene la posibilidad de frenar a algunos traficantes —y puede proporcionarles una oportunidad a algunos que se encuentran en la esclavitud de escapar a la libertad”.La trata de personas asume muchas formas: adoptados, refugiados y personas que buscan asilo y que terminan atrapadas, adolescentes que han huido de sus hogares y víctimas de secuestros. Se calcula que 27 millones de personas en todo el mundo son víctimas de esta trata, la mayoría de las cuales son utilizadas como esclavos laborales o sexuales, según el Informe sobre la trata de personas del Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos en 2013. Sólo en 2012, se identificaron otras 46.000 víctimas, dice el informe más reciente.Durante la convención anual de la Diócesis de Newark, Laura Russell, abogada y miembro de la diócesis, ofreció el 25 de enero una presentación y un taller dedicado a la trata de personas.“Fue un taller muy bueno el de ayer, sobrado de información y conocimiento”, dijo Martha Gardner, que sirve en la Junta de Justicia de la diócesis, en una entrevista con ENS al día siguiente.Después del taller, clérigos y laicos querían saber que otra preparación podría haber y qué podían hacer localmente las congregaciones para identificar y ayudar a las víctimas, dijo Gardner, que también preside la Comisión de Mujeres de la diócesis.La Diócesis de Newark ofrece medios litúrgicos aquí.En otros empeños, los episcopales de las dos diócesis del estado se han asociado con la Coalición de Nueva Jersey Contra la Trata de Personas para crear conciencia [de este azote] en comunidades que se extienden desde el norte de Nueva Jersey hasta sitios del extremo sur [del estado] como Atlantic City; en adiestrar a gerentes de hoteles, que luego entrenarían a sus empleados a identificar señales de trata de personas; así como adiestrar a los camioneros a buscar señales de que alguien está siendo retenido contra su voluntad.“Los traficantes de sexo con frecuencia eligen a personas vulnerables con antecedentes de haber sido víctimas de abusos, y luego se valen de la violencia, amenazas, mentiras, falsas promesas, retención por deudas y otras formas de control y manipulación para mantener a sus víctimas inmersas en la industria del sexo”, según el Proyecto Polaris, una organización no gubernamental que se dedica a combatir la trata de personas y que dirige línea nacional de acceso directo útil para hacer una denuncia, tener acceso a recursos, solicitar entrenamiento o recibir referencias.La coalición de Nueva Jersey también se está asociada con la SOAP, [sigla en inglés de la organización] Salve a Nuestros Adolescentes de la Prostitución, para dejar en las habitaciones de los hoteles barras de jabón envueltas con una cinta roja que da el número de la Línea Nacional de Acceso Directo sobre la Trata de Personas.“El Súper Tazón era una oportunidad de resaltar el problema”, dijo Gardner. Durante los últimos seis meses, según explicó ella, la diócesis ha estado debatiendo sobre la trata de personas y ha reunido algunos recursos al respecto. “El lunes 3 de febrero estará teniendo lugar [el Súper Tazón] aquí”.Otras organizaciones también esperan que el Súper Tazón les ayude a crear una mayor conciencia [sobre el problema de la trata].Un grupo de trabajo de las Naciones Unidas, la ONG Comité para Combatir la Trata de Personas, incluye a unas 50 organizaciones sin fines de lucro y cuenta con una gran presencia interreligiosa, entre ellos a Cavaliere; a Lynnaia Main, la funcionaria encargada de relaciones globales de la Iglesia Episcopal, y a otros episcopales. [Esta organización] ha auspiciado la GIFT Box de la ONU en Nueva York.A partir del 23 de enero, los transeúntes que pasan por la esquina de Broadway y la Calle 17 en Union Square pueden ver una gigantesca caja de regalo azul con una cinta roja. La palabra GIFT [regalo] que se destaca afuera responde a la sigla en inglés de “Iniciativa Global para Combatir la Trata de Personas”.En su interior, la caja cuenta los relatos de algunas víctimas de la trata de personas, como es el caso de Holly Smith, una estadounidense de 35 años que, cuando tenía 14 años y ya había sido víctima de explotación sexual, cayó en las manos de un traficante. Y está el relato de Sofía, una mexicana de 20 años que fue secuestrada en su país, traída a Nueva York y obligada a ejercer la prostitución por una banda internacional de traficantes.Rita Fishman, que representa al Consejo Internacional de Mujeres Judías en el Comité para Combatir la Trata de Personas, explica el origen y propósito de la caja de regalo [GIFT] de la ONU. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.El concepto de la caja de regalo surgió primero en Londres antes de los Juegos Olímpicos de 2012 como iniciativa del fundador de Frenar la Trata, dijo Rita Fishman, que representa al Consejo Internacional de Mujeres Judías en el comité de la ONG.“Uno se queda tan intrigado por la envoltura y la cinta, todo el aspecto que tiene”, dijo ella durante una entrevista con ENS el 24 de enero. “Pero, tristemente, en las manos de alguien que quiere engañarte…”.“El problema consiste es que se trata de una población oculta, y no sabemos quiénes son”. Las reacciones de los que visitan la Caja, añadió ella, van desde [los que dicen] “he aprendido muchísimo” a [los que afirman] “no sabía que eso estaba pasando aquí”.“Y cuando uno les cuenta que eso está sucediendo en Nueva York, en California, en Connecticut, se muestran incrédulos… Es sorprendente saber que está ocurriendo en tu traspatio”.El Departamento de Justicia de EE.UU. informa que, en toda la nación, de 100.000 a 300.000 niños, con edades promedio entre los 12 y los 14 años, están en peligro de [ser víctimas] de explotación sexual comercial, una forma de trata de personas, todos los años.Desde 2000, la Convención General ha aprobado varias resoluciones en que condena la trata de personas, ha apoyado a las víctimas de esta trata y ha pedido que se lleven campañas para educar al público al respecto en el ámbito denominacional. En 2012, la Convención aprobó una resolución que pedía un diálogo interprovincial [sobre el tema]. (Los Episcopales contra la trata de Personas han iniciado una página de Facebook).En marzo de 2013, la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori fue la anfitriona de un diálogo denominacional centrado en la definición de la trata de personas y en mostrar cómo se vincula con la violencia contras las mujeres y las niñas. El evento se celebró en conjunción con la reunión anual de la Comisión de las Naciones Unidas sobre la Condición de la Mujer.“He visto una evolución desde el diálogo denominacional en marzo”, dijo Main, funcionario de enlace del Comité sobre la Condición de la Mujer del Consejo Ejecutivo. “Una de las cosas que descubrimos es que hay montones de episcopales realizando labores locales: [dirigiendo] albergues, creando una conciencia educacional, yendo a los centros y administrando la Comunión, [realizando] servicios sociales y todo lo demás”.El 17 de enero, Main ayudó a coordinar una llamada de 90 minutos que incluía a unas 35 personas desde la costa oriental [de EE.UU.] hasta Hawái. Los participantes compartieron información, programas y medios sobre la trata de personas, el rescate de víctimas y materiales de concienciación para escuelas, iglesias y comunidades, así como discutieron acerca del próximo Súper Tazón.Lelanda Lee, miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo que preside el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Promoción e Interconexión para la Misión, coordina la labor del Comité sobre la Condición de la Mujer del Consejo Ejecutivo.“La trata de personas es un tema que preocupa a muchas partes de la Iglesia”, dijo Lee luego de la llamada del 17 de enero. Basándose en lo que los participantes compartieron, resulta obvio que se está llevando a cabo una ingente labor sobre el terreno, afirmó ella. “Para lo que concierne a mi comité, quiero estar consciente de esa actividad, conocer e interconectar mejor ese trabajo a través de la Iglesia.“Y también queremos apoyar la labor de la OGR [la Oficina de Relaciones Internacionales de la Iglesia Episcopal con sede en Washington, D.C.] que se relaciona con los gestores de la política respecto a la legislación que afecta a las personas que son víctimas de la trata, tanto ciudadanas como extranjeras”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Archbishop Makgoba tackles South African government on corruption

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Faith & Politics Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Posted Oct 30, 2014 Rector Bath, NC Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Africa, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL [Anglican Church of Southern Africa] The “insidious cancer of corruption” is “the most egregious threat” to South Africa’s democracy today, Archbishop of Cape Town Thabo Makgoba has said in a public lecture.Delivering the Beyers Naude Memorial Lecture at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, on Oct. 27, Makgoba also criticized suggestions that criminalizing corruption was a “Western paradigm.”“Actually, I think it’s the other way around,” he said. “Corruption is a two-way street, a two-way transaction. For corruption to happen, you have to have a corrupter, someone willing to pay the bribe, and what I will call a “corruptee,” someone willing to take a bribe. For Africans, over the 50 or 60 years since liberation, the Western paradigm — if indeed there can be said to be one — is one in which Westerners have been the corrupters, and African elites the corruptees.”The archbishop also quoted from the African Union’s 2003 “Convention On Preventing And Combating Corruption,” which said corruption and impunity had “devastating effects on the economic and social development of the African peoples.”“The most egregious threat to our democracy today is the insidious cancer of corruption. I cannot say it any more simply than that corruption is anti-democracy,” he added.Quoting his Roman Catholic counterpart in Cape Town, Archbishop Stephen Brislin, he said corruption was not new in South Africa – the colonial and apartheid systems were highly corrupt. Nor did corruption affect only governments, it affected business, corporations, NGOs and even churches.“So, while all of must be concerned about corruption, no institution can be holier-than-thou about it,” Makgoba said.“Corruption is paralyzing progress across South Africa today … The moral compasses guiding our leaders and public servants are misaligned.”The full text of the address is available here. Archbishop Makgoba tackles South African government on corruptionlast_img read more

Congregación de Montana enlaza a dos denominaciones y comparte una…

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Called to Common Mission 15th Anniversary, Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Culto en Todos los Santos, Biy Sky, Montana.Nota de la redacción: El 6 de enero de 2001, luego de 30 años de diálogo, la Iglesia episcopal y la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América, en tanto conservaban su autonomía, convinieron en juntarse para colaborar en la misión conjunta en el mundo y permitir que los clérigos se movieran libremente entre las dos iglesias. Este semana, ENS  publica la serie “Llamados a una misión común” que celebra 15 años de plena comunión episcopal-luterana.[Episcopal News Service] Los niños conocen la expresión: “La iglesia no es el campanario, la iglesia no es el edificio. La iglesia es la gente”.Para la congregación de Todos los Santos [All Saints] en Big Sky, Montana, el dicho es literalmente cierto. Un ministerio compartido de las iglesias Episcopal y Luterana en que la congregación alquila el espacio para el culto y las reuniones y no tiene ningún edificio propio.Sin el costo de mantener un edificio, la congregación dedica sus recursos a programas y al personal, contrataron a su primera pastora/sacerdote de jornada completa en enero de 2016. El no tener un edificio también allanó las posibles dificultades de unir dos congregaciones, dijo la Rda. Miriam Schmidt, la pastora/sacerdote luterana de Todos los Santos.Cuando la congregación comenzó a hablar acerca de una unión congregacional en 2005, no habían decidido cual edificio vender y cuál conservar —ni cómo hacer que un espacio viejo resultara atractivo para un grupo nuevo. En lugar de decidir al respecto, la congregación se reúne en la capilla de Big Sky, un espacio ecuménico construido por la comunidad a fines de los años 90. Además de Todos los Santos, otras dos congregaciones adoran también en ese espacio: los catolicorromanos y una fraternidad cristiana no denominacional.Añadir esta otra capa de cooperación ecuménica significa algunos dolores de cabeza: poner nuevos himnarios en los bancos después de cada oficio, coordinar reuniones y servicios especiales. Pero es el hogar para la gente de Todos los Santos y la comunidad en general la ve como un recurso y una dádiva.“Es este lugar que la gente piensa que es bello y lo ama”, dijo Schmidt. Quieren resolver cómo compartirlo”.La colaboración y el mutuo acuerdo han sido distintivos de Todos los Santos desde el comienzo.Jóvenes y líderes del campamento diurno de la congregación este verano.Los episcopales y los luteranos de Big Sky se empeñaron juntos en crear una propuesta para una unión congregacional. Ambos obispos la revisaron y la aprobaron y, en 2008, la congregación llamó a su primer pastor/sacerdote. Puesto que esta fue la primera congregación con esta clase de unión en Montana, Todos los Santos incursionaba en un nuevo territorio. La contabilidad era un área difícil, dijo Laura T. Sacchi, una de los miembros del equipo que trabajaron para crear la congregación unida. La diócesis episcopal imponía una tasación de un 19 por ciento; el Sínodo de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América solicitaba una ofrenda voluntaria. La congregación decidió dar el 19 por ciento a ambas denominaciones.La situación se hizo más complicada porque las tasaciones con frecuencia están determinadas por la membresía, la asistencia y el presupuesto. ¿Cómo podría determinar Todos los Santos qué personas eran episcopales, cuáles luteranos, y cuáles era de otras denominaciones? Y ¿qué denominación se quedaría con la porción del dinero dado por bautistas y metodistas y otros asistentes a Todos los Santos?“Decidimos simplificar nuestra contabilidad”, dijo Sacchi. Ahora dividimos el presupuesto a la mitad y enviamos el mismo porcentaje a cada centro denominacional.La Rda. Miriam Schmidt, pastora/sacerdote de Todos los Santos en Big Sky, administra la Santa Comunión.Jeanne y Patrick Miller están de acuerdo en que desarrollar una estructura común fue uno de los grandes retos para formar una congregación unida. De hecho, dijo Patrick Miller, él todavía tiene el borrador inacabado de una constitución y estatutos encima de su escritorio. Luego de varias vueltas en el intento de articular un lenguaje que respondiera a los requisitos tanto luteranos como episcopales, la congregación terminó por crear  sus “normas y procedimientos conjuntos”. El liderazgo planea revisar los problemas, y espera resolverlos, en 2017.Para el culto, la feligresía de Todos los Santos rota entre los oficios episcopales y luteranos.Al principio, a veces las personas asistían sólo al oficio de su denominación y no iban al otro, dijo Jeanne Miller. O lamentaban la ausencia de su oficio u oración preferidos, algo que se sabían de memoria o lo recordaban cariñosamente desde la niñez.En la actualidad, eso no es un problema, explicó ella. “Dejamos de oír eso. Las personas han empezado a sentirse cómodas y a disfrutar realmente de la manera en que hacemos el culto juntos”.El proceso de llegar a ser una sola congregación la ha hecho más sana, dijo Sacchi. Puesto que los feligreses tuvieron que aprender a ceder y a sacrificarse desde el principio, ya dominan las herramientas para manejar los desacuerdos.Sacchi también creen que ser una congregación conjunta está propulsando el crecimiento, con una asistencia aproximada de 90 personas los domingos.“Se ha corrido la voz de que somos este ministerio conjunto y de que acogemos a personas de todas las denominaciones”, dijo ella. “Entonces es como una bola de nieve. Cuanto más de nosotros estamos aquí tantas más personas oyen acerca de nosotros”.– Richelle Thompson es subdirectora y gerente editorial de Forward Movement. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Por Richelle Thompson Posted Dec 16, 2016 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Congregación de Montana enlaza a dos denominaciones y comparte una capilla Llamados a una Misión Común: 15 años de asociación episcopal-luterana Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Episcopal Church Foundation announces 2017 fellows

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Posted Jun 2, 2017 Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church Foundation announces 2017 fellows Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR People Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Episcopal Church Foundation press release] The Episcopal Church Foundation (ECF) has named five 2017 Fellows – Jennifer Adams-Massmann, Stewart Clem, Ashley Graham-Wilcox, Renee McKenzie-Hayward, and David Peters.The Fellowship Partners Program is ECF’s longest running program and has supported emerging scholars and ministry leaders across the Episcopal Church for more than fifty years. Established in 1964 to identify academicians who intended to teach in seminary classrooms, the program continues to support emerging scholars and ministry leaders who have a passion for forming the next generation of leaders in the Episcopal Church. A full list of past recipients is available here.ECF President Donald Romanik extended his congratulations to the 2017 Fellows saying, “The Fellowship Partners Program embodies ECF’s vision for the future of the Church, fostering theological formation and ministerial leadership, while supporting innovative scholars and leaders as they bring their passionate vision to life. This year’s Fellowship recipients are involved in a variety of initiatives that will help the Church move into exciting, new directions. We look forward to partnering closely with them over the next three years.”The five recipients’ scholarship and ministry projects demonstrate a Church that is actively engaged with the world. The 2017 Fellows are addressing the value of truth-telling in an age of fake news, developing an understanding of congregational life through the lens of trauma, strengthening veterans’ ministries, researching the role of women in ecumenical history, and expanding key Episcopal institutions’ access to and interest in a more diverse Church. Read more about each of their projects below.The 2017 Fellows are:Jennifer Adams-Massmann: Jennifer is a Ph.D. candidate in American religious history at the University of Heidelberg in Germany and an Episcopal priest. Jennifer’s dissertation project deals with the first Protestant women missionaries: the Moravians. Memoirs, mission records, and travel diaries reveal their unprecedented leadership roles and influence, but also other gendered aspects of early Moravian missions including female networks, piety, and discourse which shaped the nature of early missions. Jennifer plans to share her research with the church and wider public through various media: a book publication, academic journals, popular magazines or radio podcasts, conferences, or teaching. Her goal is to help Christians engage appreciatively but critically with our past in order to address today’s challenges. Jennifer received her B.A. in English literature and political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her M.Div. from Duke Divinity School, with studies abroad in Germany and Switzerland. Ordained in 2007, she worked in university and parish ministry in the U.S. and Germany before beginning doctoral studies. She has taught courses in American religious history at the University of Heidelberg and church history with the Cambridge Theological Federation in the UK. She recently moved to England, where she lives with her husband Alexander, a German theologian and ethicist, and their son.Stewart Clem: Stewart is a John Templeton Foundation graduate scholar and doctoral candidate in moral theology and Christian ethics at the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on the ethics of language, with a special emphasis on lying and truth-telling in contemporary society. His current project draws upon the thought of the scholastic theologian St. Thomas Aquinas to develop an account of the virtue of truth and its opposing vices. One aim of the project is to suggest ways in which faith communities can cultivate this virtue, arguing that a just community must also share a commitment to truthfulness. Stewart serves as Assisting Priest at St. Paul’s Church (Mishawaka, Indiana) and is a frequent contributor to Covenant, the weblog of The Living Church magazine. He is a graduate of Oklahoma State University (M.A., B.A.) and Duke Divinity School (M.Div.), and his essays in philosophy and theology have appeared in journals such as New Blackfriars, Religious Studies, and the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics.Ashley Graham-Wilcox: Ashley is director of communications for Episcopal Camps and Conference Centers, the nationwide network of the summer camps, retreat centers, and conference centers that serve as a front line of welcome of the world to the Episcopal Church. Ashley’s goal is for campers and retreat center guests to always feel themselves welcomed and see themselves reflected when visiting an Episcopal camp or conference center. The 86 sites and over 100 programs in Episcopal camping and retreat ministry serve incredibly diverse audiences, through summer camp, retreats, conferences, outdoor education, and teambuilding programs. This fellowship aims to expand, rethink, and empower how we welcome those diverse audiences and reflect our communities, through programming, training, and staffing. Ashley worked in high tech marketing and advertising, before finding her calling in the rad and radical hospitality of camping and retreat ministry.Renee McKenzie-Hayward: Renee is the vicar of the George W. South Memorial Church of the Advocate located in Philadelphia PA within in the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania; she has served this congregation as well as Temple University as the Episcopal Chaplain since 2011. Renee received her PhD from Temple University in 2005 with a concentration on Womanist Thought and the Philosophy of Religion. The Church of the Advocate sits at the center of a historically black community, adjacent to Temple University. As an established community hub offering a variety of social service programs, the Advocate is a central place for the community to organize for social justice. Generational and sudden trauma extracts a great toll on this community. Renee’s project will develop a Trauma Informed Ministry that understands the human cost of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome and informed by Womanist and Liberation Theologies. The proposed project will enhance the Advocate’s work by organizing the ministry under a framework of healing trauma. Trauma Informed Ministry will the lens that informs relationships and services offered with and among congregation members and community. Staff and congregational leaders will better understand the manifestations of trauma, allowing the traumatized to heal via a holistic approach to wellness addressing the needs of the mind, body and spirit.David Peters: David enlisted in the Marine Corps in his teens, finished college and seminary, and went to work as a youth minister in a suburban church in Pennsylvania. Shortly after 9/11 and the U.S. invasion of Iraq, David volunteered to serve as an Army chaplain and deployed to Iraq in 2005. After Iraq, he was assigned to the amputee and psych wards of Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. These experiences in war and the trials of homecoming led him to start the Episcopal Veterans Fellowship in the Diocese of Texas in 2014. The EVF equips the Church for ministry to veterans with moral injury and the spiritual and theological affects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This grant will enable David to travel to parishes and dioceses across the Church to nurture existing veterans ministries and coach parishes and dioceses as they start new ones. David is a graduate of Seminary of the Southwest and the author of two books on war and reconciliation. His most recent is Post-Traumatic God, published by Church Publishing in 2016. An engaging preacher, his 9/11 sermon, “Learning War and Reconciliation,” won the Reconciliation Preaching Prize from Trinity, Wall Street in 2015. If you would like David to come to your parish or diocese to share the work of EVF, please contact him at [email protected] Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more